Create a surreal moon composition

Create a surreal moon composition

Create a surreal moon composition

Create a surreal moon composition – For as long as night has followed day, humans have been obsessed with the moon, whether they’ve been viewing it through a telescope, or landing on it in the 1960s and 1970s. Artistically though, it makes a great focus for a composition!

In this project, we’re going to explore how to make a composition realistic in tone, if not in scale. The idea is simple: our subject is placing a moon into the sky with help from a step ladder, and so we’re going to need to make sure the image is balanced in terms of the size of its elements. Don’t be afraid to lay out your stock images on the page when you start: sometimes before making a composition such as this, it can help to rough it out first.

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The most important thing, though, is just to have fun and experiment whenever you can. There are loads of great techniques you can learn from attempting a project like this, and we’ve supplied everything you’ll need to recreate this image in your own style on the FileSilo. So download, and get creating!

Learn how to age portraits

Learn how to age portraits

Learn how to age portraits

Learn how to age portraits – Posters, commercials, and various advertisements today all seem to be selling some sort of age-defying product, feeding an eager public with tips and tricks on how to look younger than they actually are. The cosmetics industry alone makes billions from skin products that mask fine lines and obvious indications of age, while clothing lines keep releasing collections aimed at people who want to wear clothes that make them look young. Everyone seems to want to go back to the so-called happier times of their youth, but the truth is that age is not something to deny or shy away from – it is something to be welcomed. After all, no wrinkle will ever dull your true shine, right?

This tutorial will focus on quick and easy tips for how to make a portrait look older, just to prove that getting old doesn’t have to be a terrifying task. In fact, by using subtle blending with layer masks, you can age a photo realistically and gracefully. Are you curious to see how you’d look like in a few years? Go ahead and try it out – age your own photo at home and embrace the best years of your life that are yet to come!

Make a creative clock face

Make a creative clock face

Make a creative clock face – If you’re looking for an original way to display your artwork on a wall, there aren’t many more novel ways than to create a clock face. It’s something you’re bound to look at a few times a day, and its only obstructions are a couple of hands across its face.

While creating a clock might be a creative idea you’d never even considered though, it’s as much about the maths of measuring out the degrees of a circle as it is about creating something bright and colourful in Elements. One aspect that will really define your clock is where you decide to place the numerals, and it’s important to get

that right: but luckily Elements has all the tools necessary for creating with precision.

Ultimately though, aside from the numerals and markers on the clock for the 60 minutes, the design is totally up to you. We’ve taken inspiration from a famous clock in Prague, and updated it with a modern twist of a geometric font and beach photo; but you can create whatever you like. You may want to take the idea of the circle and run with that, or you might want to just create any kind of design and add the numbers on after.

Dodge and burn your photos

Dodge and burn your photos

Dodge and burn your photos

Dodge and burn your photos – There are so many techniques for making your images pop. Different photo editors use different skills to try and get their images sharp, contrasted and bright, but two of the most popular tools for finishing off your photos are Dodge and Burn.

Polar opposites but used in conjunction with one another, Dodge and Burn are two of the oldest features, but are still popular for their command of tone and brightness. They can be applied to any image to improve the light and shade in your photos. They’re extremely similar to brushes: think of them as being brushes that apply blend modes to your work rather than colour. Namely, Color Burn in the case of Burn, and Screen in the case of Dodge.

While you can apply the Dodge and Burn tools to any image, the absolute best way to apply them is to do so non-destructively. By making your edits on a new layer, you can use them almost like an adjustment layer, enabling yourself to edit them again if needed, reduce the opacity, or delete them completely. Editing nondestructively is the most organised way to work, for these reasons, but also so that you can view each of your edits as layers, and stay on top of your workflow.

Dodge and Burn might not be fancy new tools added in the latest few versions of Elements, but they’re solid, reliable and capable of improving your photos to various degrees.

Blending digital and traditional artwork

Blending digital and traditional artwork

Blending digital and traditional artwork – Finding one’s style in Photoshop is something that every digital artist does, but learning to develop and evolve your style is something altogether more challenging.

With her Little Red Boubou project, a children’s book based on the fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, Typhaine Le Gallo took her original creative process and then adapted it for the needs of the project. The subsequent illustrations have been featured in Behance’s Photoshop and Illustration galleries as a result, proving that often the very best work comes from innovation.

We caught up with Typhaine to ask about her creative process, her influences, and how she made these beautiful illustrations.

Have you always been interested in art, Typhaine?

I initially studied mathematics and computer programming; I worked for around 10 years as a graphic programmer in the video game industry. But I have always enjoyed drawing and four years ago I decided to go back to university to take illustration classes and study for a graphic design baccalaureate. This is where I discovered Photoshop.

As a graphic programmer, was it easy to get to grips with Photoshop when you first used it?

Yes, I found it to be mathematics applied on pixels. The layers, masks and post-effects work are very intuitive for me as I developed similar features in video games. I chose to take a professional photography class to learn how to edit pictures, as to start with I simply wanted to create illustrations with traditional materials and enhance them in Photoshop.

Who would you say are your biggest artistic influences?

My biggest artistic influence is Rebecca Dautremer, a wonderful French children’s book illustrator. I think she uses Photoshop almost exactly for the same steps than my own process: to improve a sketch, to test colours before applying traditional mediums, and to enhance the final scanned picture. A few years ago I discovered another big influence: the work of Victo Ngai, an editorial illustrator. For the first time I discovered a process almost entirely done in Photoshop, which was truly resonating with me, and it was the one I decided to use for the Little Red Boubou project.

So was the Little Red Boubou project completed entirely in the Photoshop software?

Well, for Little Red Boubou I wanted to push my use of Photoshop, but still use my usual watercolour pencil textures. To do so, I drew lines with black ink on paper, scanned the drawings and a lot of textures created with traditional mediums, and assembled the whole thing in Photoshop. I always start with a sketch on paper, then I move and distort the objects and characters a lot in Photoshop until I’m happy with the composition.

What are your favourite tools to use in Photoshop?

Mainly the tools I use are the Magic Wand Tool in conjunction with the Refine Edge option. I also love using certain adjustment layers, specifically Selective Color, Hue/ Saturation and Brightness/Contrast. For the Little Red Boubou project, I created the illustrations by selecting areas between the black lines and using masks to apply my scanned textures to the selected areas and to the lines. Then for every area, I modified the colour of the applied texture to get the exact colour that I had in mind. Finally I added shadows and highlights by darkening or lightening the colours of my lines and textures on specific areas.

This creative process is slightly different to your usual, then. What made you head in a new direction for this project?

The style I used for the Little Red Boubou project differs a little bit from my usual illustrations, even if they are still similar. There are two reasons for that: first I had a very short amount of time to finish the illustrations for this book, secondly as I wanted heavily contrasted black-and-white drawings to be able to select the areas easily, I used black ink and continuous lines. As a result my lines are a little bit stronger and the look is more ‘naive’ and colourful than usual, which was not a problem for me as I thought it was a good match to represent an African adaptation of Little Red Riding Hood.

Nothing is better than to work on a whole project of at least 10 illustrations by applying the same Photoshop recipe on all the illustrations. This recipe should be compatible with what you like to do with traditional mediums: for example, for me it was essential to keep the textures of watercolour pencils. I learnt a lot during the Little Red Boubou project. I only really mastered the software after spending a lot of time on these 32 pages of illustrations in Photoshop. Before that I was mainly trying to edit my pictures to fix the loss of colours and contrast due to the scan. Since then I am still using traditional techniques, but now Photoshop is an essential part of my process to get the final atmosphere and palette of colours that I have in mind.

Create an awesome space scene

Create an awesome space scene

Create an awesome space scene

Create an awesome space scene – Explore new ways to use filters, layer styles and masks to create an out-of-this-world composition

Let’s create an awesome space composition from a sketch using some of the most impressive features in Photoshop: filters, layer styles and masks. In this tutorial, you’ll explore each one of these powerful commands and discover how to apply them for realistic effects. To begin, you’ll create stars using the Noise filter and then you’ll learn a clever way to add some twinkles using the Motion Blur filter. Next, you’ll use the Cloud filter, blending modes and brushes to create a colourful nebula. Finally, you will place the images and use the layer styles to add glows and apply

other techniques to complete the composition and make it work as a whole.

You can try out different settings for the styles, adjustments and blend modes, but it’s important to use vivid colours for the nebula to make the image stand out. If you are using Photoshop Elements, don’t forget to check the side stepper for more information on the editing process. There are so many good tips and tricks in this tutorial that at the end, you will have new skills to start using in your own projects. Download the stock images from FileSilo now, and start learning.

3D modelling in Photoshop

3D modelling in Photoshop

3D modelling in Photoshop

3D modelling in Photoshop – Learn the essential skills to transforming 2D textures into 3D objects and create a fantastic cityscape

Are you ready to jump into the 3D world? The Photoshop 3D tools are a great place to start. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to add another dimension to flat images using the Photoshop 3D commands. You’ll learn how to work within the dedicated 3D environment, apply textures, create 3D objects, modify the lighting and render the final composition.

To work in the 3D environment in Photoshop, you will need to juggle three different panels simultaneously. The first is the Layers panel; here you will place the regular images, create 3D layers

and merge the 3D models. The second is the 3D panel. It shows the elements related to the 3D objects; 3D layers, Material layers, Light, and Camera/view. Finally, the third is the Properties panel. After you select the elements in the 3D panel, the Properties panel lets you tweak the settings. For example, you can deform the object, add material, define the light intensity and more. Pay close attention to each step, because you’ll have to jump back and forth to each panel. Check the Expert tip for extra advice on how to use the camera/view and the on-screen controls.

Turn any photo into an abstract oil painting

Turn any photo into an abstract oil painting

Turn any photo into an abstract oil painting

Turn any photo into an abstract oil painting – There are several ways to create an oil painting effect in Photoshop. The fastest and easiest way is a rather cool feature, aptly named the Oil Paint filter. It enables you to take any photo and easily turn it into a ‘painting’ by tweaking a few sliders. As is the case with many other Photoshop filters, using it alone creates a common-looking, much less interesting result. However, combining it with other filters opens up a whole new world of possibilities.

In this tutorial, we’ll take you through the process of transforming a mandrill photo into an illustration,

and show you how we use filters in Photoshop to speed up and achieve a painting effect. We’ll also show you how to prepare your image before applying the filters to get the result we want. Check out our Expert Tip for more specific advice on the Blend-If sliders.

The images used in this tutorial are all provided on the FileSilo. You can also download the layered PSD to get a better understanding of exactly how you can build up your artwork. Once you have worked through the technique, you can try applying it to other kinds of photos.

Blend with layer masks

Blend with layer masks

Produce a trendy animal double-exposure effect using layer masks, blend modes and adjustment layers

Blend with layer masks – Double-exposure imagery has roots in photography. A juxtaposing of two (or even more) images due to multiple exposures, this technique oftentimes yields startlingly beautiful visuals. You’ve more than likely seen this effect on album covers, advertisements and posters.

Double exposures can be achieved in Photoshop using multiple layers stacked on top of one another and merged using layer masks and blend modes.

Before you get to the blending, though, you’ll want to make selections of the playing pieces. Here you’ll start by selecting and isolating an animal and some mountains. You can certainly make the blend without isolating these, but freeing each from their respective backgrounds will give you flexibility in editing as well as deployment. Blending will be facilitated, and you can adjust the background or swap it altogether.

The initial animal-mountainscape meld will be realised with masks. You’ll then enhance with blend modes, layering clouds with Screen and doing a bit of painting with Color and Pin Light. Some choice adjustments will help to add the final spit and polish.

After completing the tutorial, why not try your own double exposure? Find a worthy animal or person, then pair your subject with an interesting scene or object.

Master basic 3D in Photoshop

Master basic 3D in Photoshop

Get to grips with the essentials of Photoshop’s 3D tools to create a background scene for a digital painting

Master basic 3D in Photoshop – Cities look beautiful at night, and they can be an attractive setting to use in digital paintings and illustrations. However, without any perspective tools or objects, city scenes can be an intimidating subject to paint. But with a little knowledge of Photoshop’s 3D tools, you can make this process a lot less painful.

Before you start, make sure your computer is powerful enough to run the 3D software. If you have never modelled a 3D object in your life before, don’t worry. In this tutorial, we will be covering the absolute basics of creating and reshaping 3D objects in Photoshop.

Although Photoshop’s built-in 3D tools are not as powerful as the tools featured in dedicated programs such as Maya, they are certainly enough for creating shapes that fit the perspective of the scene you want to paint, which is exactly what we need to complete this cityscape piece.

We will also be using illustrative and digital painting techniques to complete this image, so even if you do not intend to use 3D objects in your work on a regular basis, there are drawing and colour-editing techniques you may still find useful. Most importantly, though, be sure to have fun!